Mongoose 5.0.0-rc0 introduced several important changes to the way middleware works. The most pronounced difference is the ability to use promises and async/await with mongoose middleware. In addition, there are a couple more subtle changes that make the middleware API more consistent. In this article, I'll cover two changes. The first is that post hooks now always get flow control, even synchronous post hooks. The second is that query middleware is applied when the model is compiled for performance reasons.

This is the beginning of my first subscriber-only article on The Code Barbarian's Patreon. The article goes into much more depth than normal tech articles and has enough content to fill an ebook, so the whole article is only available to Patreon subscribers. If you like this article, please consider subscribing on Patreon to support future in-depth guides. The next article, "Building Distributed Locking with Node.js and MongoDB", ships on January 15, 2018!

Mongoose 5.0.0-rc0 was released yesterday. This is the first backwards-breaking release for mongoose since 4.0.0 was released in March 2015. The major forcing functions for this release were that MongoDB 3.6 removed support for the way mongoose did authentication (which is why mongoose needed the useMongoClient option) and the 3.0.0 release of the official MongoDB Node.js driver. Another major priority for Mongoose 5 was dropping support for Node.js < 4 and MongoDB < 3.0.0. Both Node.js 0.12 and MongoDB 2.6 are about a year past their official end-of-life, and removing support for them has enabled us to make our code base much leaner.

Turf.js has become an indispensible part of my Node.js

Monogram has a powerful middleware system that makes cross-cutting concerns easy. One use case is denormalization, the practice of storing all or part of one document in another document. Denormalization is a powerful paradigm for both performance and data integrity. When done well, denormalization means you only need one query to fetch all necessary data, rather than using joins or $lookup stages that may require their own indexes.

Mongoose 4.13 was released a couple weeks ago, with support for a powerful new feature: middleware for aggregation. The primary motivation for this feature was to enable plugins like mongoose-explain to work with aggregate(), as well as enabling us to refactor discriminators to be a plugin. Aggregation middleware is a natural complement to query middleware, it lets you apply a lot of the use cases for hooks like pre('find') and post('updateOne') to aggregation. In this article, I'll demonstrate using aggregation middleware to enforce soft deletes, and explain how aggregation middleware works with aggregation cursors.

Mongoose 4.13 was released last week. As usual, its packed with powerful new features. The most exciting new feature is the ability to set localField, foreignField, and ref dynamically for virtual populate. The syntax for virtual populate's dynamic properties is slightly different than the one for conventional populate, but we think this new syntax is much more powerful.

One of the most compelling reasons for async/await is the fact that async functions generally feel like simplified threads, or threads with predictable interrupts. There are numerous