In 2015, I started working on a new ODM for MongoDB and Node.js. It was based on the now-obsolete Object.observe() function, and I unfortunately had to scrap the whole project when the Object.observe() proposal was unexpectedly withdrawn. A lot of the core logic from the original ODM lives on in Archetype. But my brief time in Redux land and studying falcor taught me a crucial lesson: the Model-View-Controller paradigm is not the only way to do things. MVC and ODMs still make sense, but we can build a stronger, more functional abstraction as the basis for a more concise architecture. The new monogram has now been powering 100% of Booster's API queries for weeks and it's officially production ready. Here's what monogram is all about.

Mongoose 4.11 introduced an important new option to work around a major deprecation. The useMongoClient option is the source of the 'open() is deprecated in mongoose' deprecation warning that has caused so much discussion. This option opts you in to using Mongoose 4.11's simplified initial connection logic and allows you to avoid getting a deprecation warning from the underyling MongoDB driver.

Mongoose 4.11 was released last week and includes several neat new features. It also has one very important deprecation, so before you upgrade please read about the useMongoClient option in the docs. I'll write more about useMongoClient and why it is necessary another time. But first, mongoose 4.11 enables a new plugin, mongoose-lean-virtuals, which lets you apply virtuals to query results even if you use the lean() function. This plugin is a more general version of mongoose-lean-id.

You might remember locking from your undergrad systems programming class. Locks help when multiple threads that can be interrupted at any time access a shared resource. In distributed programming (like building a Node.js server that talks to a database) you have a similar problem: parallel operations can mutate documents in the database in conflicting ways. In particular, enforcing uniqueness, such as making sure only one user has a given email, is tricky.

Mongoose setters have always had the limitation that they only work for save(), not for queries. For example, let's say you have a schema that enforces your emails are always lowercase:

One great perk of async/await in Node.js is how well it integrates with existing libraries. By now, most popular Node.js libraries support some sort of promise-based API, so they integrate nicely with async/await. You might even have the pleasure of removing a few dependencies from your package.json if you start using async/await instead of co. In this article, I'll show you how async/await works with mocha tests, express routes and middleware, and mongoose queries and cursors.

Mongoose 4.10.0 just landed and brings with it several powerful features and bug fixes. The most +1-ed feature in this supporting unique in array definitions via the mongoose-unique-array plugin. This feature is implemented as a separate plugin because mongoose-unique-array does much more than simply create a unique index, it also ties in to validators and versioning. In this article, I'll explain how to use mongoose-unique-array and the caveats you need to be aware of when using it.