There's a lot of misinformation on how to use async/await with React and Redux. In general, React does not

Async/await is the most important new feature in JavaScript in recent memory.

Async/await is the big new feature in the 2017 edition of the JavaScript language spec.

One great perk of async/await in Node.js is how well it integrates with existing libraries. By now, most popular Node.js libraries support some sort of promise-based API, so they integrate nicely with async/await. You might even have the pleasure of removing a few dependencies from your package.json if you start using async/await instead of co. In this article, I'll show you how async/await works with mocha tests, express routes and middleware, and mongoose queries and cursors.

Async/await makes it easy to integrate asynchronous behavior with imperative constructs like for loops, if statements, and try/catch blocks. Unfortunately, it doesn't do the same for functional constructs like forEach, map, reduce, and filter. Using these constructs with async functions leads to behavior that can seem downright baffling. In this article, I'll show you some common gotchas for async functions with JavaScript's built-in functional array methods and how to work around them.

Async/await in Node.js opens up a host of powerful design patterns. Tasks that used to take complex libraries or intricate promise chaining can now be done with rudimentary if statements and for loops. I already wrote about these kind of design patterns with co, but async/await makes these patterns accessible in vanilla Node.js, no outside libraries required.

Arguably the biggest new feature in Node.js 7.6.0 is that the much awaited async function keyword is now available without a flag. Callback hell and promise hell are now in the past. But, like Uncle Ben always reminded us, with great power comes great responsibility, and async/await gives you a lot of new and exciting ways to shoot yourself in the foot. You still need to handle errors and be aware of the async nature of your code, otherwise you'll inevitably be complaining about "async/await hell" in 6 months.